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All right, this is the DDD podcast. I’m here with Clint Pulver and he is a keynote speaker and soon to be author. Been working on a lot of research around the millennial mind and kind of managing this cultural differences in businesses in corporate and high schools and colleges and focusing a lot on how to really help shift our own mindsets and our own ways of helping this younger generation and in bridging the gap, I guess you could say would probably be a good way to put it. Right. Um, and we’re having to make door to door con. So he is a main stage speaker and has a little surprise for us, which I think is cool. I don’t know if I want to spill the beans. How much you like to keep it like, yeah, like it’s not the typical key note. So if you’re coming to the door to con that’s true.

Yeah. I want to give it a little like surprise. We can’t like spill. Uh, yeah. Keep you guessing. But you also, uh, if you’re not committed to our, to our con, shame on you go get your ticket prices go up at the end of the month and uh, yeah, let’s dive into this. Let’s do this. So tell us a little bit, I mean we jammed off camera or whatever, but you, you know, and then always want to be a keynote speaker. It’s not like you’re in high school though. And yeah. I want to go and train people in the world. Like what, what kind of got that Roland? Like how’d you get into that?

Yes, I spoke, I spoke at church, uh, when I was a senior in high school. There was a guy that in the congregation that owned a leadership consulting company and he heard me speak and he came up after and he said, Hey, we’re doing a leadership conference, uh, down in Southern Utah and we want you to come speak to to it and we would love for you and as opposed to high school kids and we want you to do a workshop. And I said, no way. Like I have no desire to do that. Uh, I’m not speaking to other high school kids. And he said, listen, I’ll pay you 500 bucks. And I was like, okay. Yeah, when he, when do you need me? Like, when can I do that? And uh, I’m in bucks school, high school kid. Like that’s a lot of money.

And I went down and I did, I loved it. I had a great time. I put together this little workshop I still do a variation of to this day. And I had six schools that came up to me after and said, we want you to come speak, uh, at our school. And I grew up in a small town and I didn’t realize that like professional speaking was a career. The professional speaking was a full time job for people and that people did it a lot. And uh, that kind of opened up my eyes to this possibility and uh, had been speaking ever since. That was, yeah, that was a long time ago. And then full time I jumped into the career after still I wanted to fly or I was a helicopter pilot, went to flight school. Um, and then actually then I had an eye disease that ended that career and I jumped into the medical field for a long time. It was not happy there as so three and a half years ago jumped into the full time speaking world, full time burning all the ships. And uh, it’s been one of the best things I’ve ever done.

And when you’re good, you just keep getting gigs. I think that’s the part where it’s like you don’t have to be like, that’s what’s cool is like you, you speak a hundred times a year and it’s not like you’re having to beg people to get you to speak. Like you did so well your very, very first time speaking six other, it created another six gigs. I mean, that’s, that’s to say something.

That’s cool. Yeah. And I think I w I’ve learned, I don’t know. I think it’s true with any industry, right? The market speaks, the market will always speak and if you’re good enough, if you are, if you add enough value, if you solve a big enough problem, if your product is good enough, if it’s relevant enough, if it’s significant enough, then the market speaks. There will be a demand for that. And I, I, uh, I’ve just always, we’ve tried in our business to always make sure that we’re bringing as much value as possible and we’re doing it in a way that’s different, unique, uh, still relevant. Scott, the content. But above all, I think some of the greatest keynote speakers right now in the industry, they provide an experience. And so we’ve tried really hard to make sure that we provide an experience, not just a keynote. Love the,

so you, you’ve grown up in Utah and so you’ve had friends and know people that have done door to door sales and none of those companies. And maybe you spoke to a few. What are you most excited about when, when looking to create an experience on the main stage, where do you feel like your message or your experience that you could create, could resonate the most with people we speak to? Yeah, I think, I think you, first off in this industry, you’ve got an eclectic group of different generations. You’ve got some gen excers, you’ve got millennials, and now you’ve got gen Z. You’ve got the younger generation that’s coming up into this world. And there’s so many different, uh, stereotypes, uh, different personalities, different attitudes, uh, from the leader and, or for the mentor from the mentee, from, uh, you know, the guy on his first door to door gang

to, you know, the, the gal that’s been managing for the last, you know, seven years. Uh, I always hear that, you know, if there’s that stigma of, you know, the generation, the younger generation doesn’t know how to work, you know, generations lazy. The younger generation is entitled, the right, the millennials, the millennials. That’s what everybody, uh, I dunno, that’s just kind of the stigma. It’s them, it’s the mantra. And me being a millennial, uh, I’ve definitely heard that. I definitely felt that. And now with our undercover research, uh, it’s been interesting to see the differences in businesses that work with that generation because there are businesses right now that are for the majority, all employed, uh, by, by millennials is the millennials, the manager or the employee or the actual frontline employee is a millennial and they’re killing it. And I it, Oh man, I’ve had so many business managers and business owners say that they love the millennial generation and that they, that’s all they invest in, that we have chosen to specifically invest in rather than trying to cut out the 60 year old corporate key cause they’ve learned, they’ve learned to just utilize people, not just the generation.

And that Sabrina, to talk about our undercover research, we started what’s called the undercover millennial program. Uh, this was five years ago and we have now interviewed over 181 different companies that we’ve worked with. And in that process have interviewed over 10,000 young millennial employees undercover. So think a undercover boss, if you could have seen that TV show without the makeup. Okay. So how it works is set my baby face [inaudible] literally I look literally like this. I go to the backwards hat and I wear my Nike’s, my joggers and I go in off the street as, as someone who’s looking for a job. So you know, if you’re listening to this, I think of your business, think of your, your company. And I would walk into the front door and literally just say, Hey, I’m just looking, thinking about applying. I was thinking about that, you know, putting in my resume and you’re looking for a job and I just wanted to ask him what was it like to work here? And then I ask him to tell me about your management. You see yourself working here longterm. What’s the culture like?

Do you enjoy the job and you know what happens? They tell me everything. Everything from the good to the bad. What’s working, what’s not working because I’m not a survey, I’m not another manager. I’m not a one on one meeting, I’m just not a consultant coming in. I’m just a millennial. And what we feel like we have done in our research is that we have passed the most real and authentic data when it comes to how great organizations have created loyalty that lasts. How we found that great leaders have created organizations where their people never want to leave. And that was the magic of all of the research is because out of the 10,000 people that we’ve interviewed, when an employee would say, I love it here, when they love my job, I love my manager would have to come work here, can you can feel.

It wasn’t like a, I need to say this, but in the side. Absolutely. And then in the research we looked for trends, right? You didn’t want to just catch one employee on a good day or one employee on a bad day. We looked for cultural trends within the organization where the majority of people would say, I love my job and that’s what we have a book that’s coming out in fall of 2020 and it’s based off of all the research and we call the book. I love it here. How great leaders create an organization that people never want to leave. And I wanted to write a book that was solution-based and that a leader, a manager, a CEO, an HR director, anybody that goes by the title of a influencer and leader or boss could read this and go, okay, here’s, here’s what I can do. And here’s what great leaders have done that has gotten results through the eyes of the employee.

That’s the difference between our book and you know, maybe another leadership book or a leadership guru book. Anybody can write a book on leadership from the leader’s perspective. But what we wanted to do is create a leadership book from there. People’s perspective from the actual employee’s eyes and what works for them. And it’s just valuable. It’s unique, it’s different, but it is universal. And we have found that it is not a millennial problem. It is a leadership problem. It is a business problem. And the better that leaders can get at looking at their people as people and not a generation, that’s the first step in winning, I think.

Yeah. Cause they, they’re going to coin their generation as the right generation and they’re going to say, well, the way that we’ve been doing it or I’ve been doing it or the, you know, there’s no one like us and they stopped looking at it as like, dude, that guy’s a person too. His our beat in a soul and needs and wants and recognition and this and that. You know what I mean? Just like how you probably got led when you first got started in [inaudible].

Exactly. It’s the difference between mentorship versus management and mentorship is a totally different world than leadership. You know, leadership, you, you that you’re, that you, if you’re the leader, you’re the person that has the vision, you have the ultimate objective. You have the ultimate hindsight that this is where we’re going, where the mentor is the person that literally walks the path with you. The mentor is the person that you like yourself best when you’re with them because of who the mentor is. And when leaders develop that and came back, it built loyalty. That was just unbreakable like you think about it. The thing about like the teacher that changed your life in school or think about that one coworker or that one manager that you just loved. I guarantee it was because they got to the part about you and they were some person that you thought was cool. They had confidence, they were credible, they had competence, they were someone that was probably honest with you in a way that was loving and surrounded by care. You look at any great movie, you know, any, any good sports film or you don’t think about that yet.

Aladdin had the genie, right? Simba had mu fossa, Rocky had Mick, uh, any great like there was always, always new mentors. Yeah, we don’t talk, we don’t think about it from even a great movies. And that’s what makes the story so great is yes, you have this, you don’t have, you have the Rocky, you have the Latin, you have the Sims of the person that’s going through the journey. But it is the mentor that comes in and makes that story so compelling and so sweet. Why? Because the mentor is the person that connected the mentee to their dream. And get, and that’s what you have to do. That’s what great leaders were doing is they were connecting people to their dreams. When people knew, Kate, when I show up to work and I learned from you and I associate with you and I become good friends with you and I build a relationship with you, it’s gonna better my life.

Yeah, you’re the some connection to what’s better and what’s beautiful about our industry. And I think a lot of people, you know, my whole speech last year was tapping into the millennial, like seeing it from, we’re missing the boat. Millennials are looking for financial freedom, independence, entrepreneurship. You know, you look at it and it’s like a lot of these guys, they’re just wanting the same thing that everybody wants, like financial freedom and time and travel and experiences. And I’m looking at it and going, how has that, how’s that different than what you’ve always wanted? And number two, what, what better industry? Like is there a better industry that gives that? So simply you can make as much money as you want in our space. You can travel quite a bit. Like your freedom level is high. You can work in a company where guys were, you know, shirts and shorts and where what you want.

You can, you know what I mean? They’re putting on cold leadership trainings. They’re helping with personal development, they’re working on finance, getting your investments. Like I’m like what other industries, like have that accelerated path and yet we’re missing the boat in the sense of we’re not teaching, you know, we’re not focused on that aspect of our job. We’re saying we’re discrediting gen X, gen Z, gen Y because of it. Jump a generation like, no, no, no, no, no, no. Go back to what you said, but just manage people, which sexually that’s what they want. You just have a vehicle that’s going to get it to them faster. You just need to be a better leader or a connection to their dream and goal. I love that. My left, I kind of associate it to movies cause it makes it, it makes it so relatable. I mean that’s, yeah, that’s true.

And is relatable to say again to you in life. Like ask you the name of the teacher that changed your life or that one mentor in, in, in door to door sales that just made a difference for you. It took you under your wing and helped you and I were the person, I guarantee that that learned to advocate for you as much as they developed you. They advocated, they, they focused on the connection piece. They focused on creating loyalty, they got to the part about you and that always led to a more empowered person. Now you have empowered people that always leads to higher productivity. And here’s an interesting, so I consult a lot of companies. I’ve probably done my own level of research with a hundred different companies over the last two years and spent a lot of time with their leaders and their reps and the owners.

And one thing that I’m finding a lot, maybe you found this was the person with the title of manager or maybe the title of whatever. Didn’t necessarily always be the mentor. Like sometimes they have the wrong people in the wrong situations. And I don’t know if you caught that ever. Like you might’ve had a really good sales rep that just had a good heart and loved stepping in and mentoring the new guy and you know, you really look at it. It’s like who had the biggest influence? Who had the biggest impact on that employee? You’re like, no. It wasn’t necessarily always the boss. It wasn’t, and I’m seeing it more and more. I had a call last week with a CEO and I said, problem is is your director of sales has no influence. It’s that random guy that you always call headache, that when I’m there, they’re always hanging out with that guy.

That’s right. And I’m like, ask yourself as much as you complain about that guy, that’s right. Ask yourself without him, who’s, who’s really influencing your people tell him and he’s like, he’s like, no, but I’ve thought about firing him for two years and I go, no, you just haven’t seen the gift in him and you haven’t given him what he needs. Like you’ve always treated him as the ugly stepchild and your favorite and your son in law. Who’s this? You know, we’ll call it, what’s the word? When your family work, nepotism, the nepotism, when you have your family in your own business. I’m like, yeah, you’re trying to just protect your family. But in reality the real leader is the guy that’s sitting there with everybody’s under their wing and I kind of had to slap him up and I was like, you could either take that as feedback or you can do nothing with it, but it is what it is.

I can’t change who’s influencing your people. That’s right. Who has the mentor, um, capability, capabilities or, or heart or drive, you know, he’s got a good heart. He just isn’t doing it. And I think, I don’t know if you found that in companies, but yeah, 100%. Yeah. Your, your, your title as a manager, you know, the title might make you a manager, but your people decide if you’re a mentor. Yeah. And I think that there’s a huge distinction between mentor and manager and I think that, yeah. And mentor ship has to be hurt. Like you have to, uh, I dunno. You have to, you have to earn the hearts of your people. They will invite you in. And mentorship is an invitation. They, you seek out the mentors. The mentor doesn’t like come to you. It’s a, it’s a wig that yes, we could, we always found that, yeah,

that mentorship is always sought out by, by the mentee. It’s earned. It is earned. Like if you become a mentor, you’ve earned that in some way, shape or form. And then we call it the five characteristics of mentorship that we found in those great leaders that were still leaders, right? Cause leadership and mentorship. They’re very close. Yeah. Uh, but that role of mentor really came because the leader was confident. They competence it had some credibility in some way, shape or form. And you have the ability to be honest. But man, you cared. So those were the five characteristics that we found in any great mentor, uh, that they, they exuded those so well to the point that people say, I must connect with you. I want you to be apart of my life. And it’s this really cool, different, unique way of looking at leadership or sometimes leadership we look at, you must be the person to influence and you have to be the person to reach out and you have no, it’s, it’s, it’s, it’s have those five characteristics and do a really good job and making sure that your people know those and you exude those and do those well and people will go, yeah, you’re the, you’re the, you’re the one, you’re the one that’s going to connect me to my dreams.

Love. Yeah.

Love that. So what other downfalls or upsides or things did you find in this research around companies that created lasting retention? You can’t find other jobs with such a high, I mean, maybe I’m wrong, but I’m biased. It’s like this probably has the lowest retention rate in history. Our space. It’s like I tell people, I’m like, if you could hire a hundred people and keep 20 of them, you’re doing good. Congratulations. Totally. Where seasonal. Yeah. And it’s seasonal and it’s hard and it’s mentally challenging and guys don’t necessarily want to do it forever. And you know, there’s so much, but, but what’s shocking is there have been companies that have done a phenomenal job creating guys like me that did it for 10 12 years, you know what I mean? They want to stay in it. And they kept me coming back. Like, you know, it was amount of times that come August, September, I’m never doing this again. You know what I mean? I’m, I’m driving home like, yes, in my last year, you know what I mean? Like no way. Like, uh, but, but yet again, the companies did something to keep me coming back. You know what I mean? So like what are some of the things that you’ve seen the do’s and don’ts? Like don’t do this, that drives people away or do, do this. It kept it kept people. Yeah, I think, well, first of all out there, there were never

unnecessarily strict do’s and don’ts. It was always dependent upon a situation and it was always dependent upon a person. Yeah. It was a, people play in there. And I think, I think one thing that we’ve learned, especially in doing the book and writing the book, it’s hard to kind of say this is the way you should always be. And no matter what, this is the strategy that will always work. It doesn’t necessarily work like that. Now there are themes and there are overall principles that do work. But how people receive that and how people want to receive that is different. We about in the book a little bit, uh, the difference between the golden rule and the platinum rule, the golden rule is treat other people the way you want to be treated. Right? You know, do you want to others as you would happen?

Do you want to eat the, you treat people the way you want to be treated. And the platinum rule is treat other people the way they want to be treated. Uh, there’s a difference there. Uh, I hear so many times from, from, from leaders they go, you know, it’s, it’s so frustrating. Like I’m leading the horse to water. I can’t make them drink though. We give them training. I tell him exactly what to do. We, we, we give them the opportunity. They’ve got the benefits, they’ve got the recognition, they’ve got the fancy swag bag. I’m giving them that. I just can’t make them drink though I can’t make him drink. And uh, you know, this is you listening, listen, uh, uh, again, that mantra, I can lead the horse to water but I can’t make it drink. And that’s not true. If you want to get a horse to drink, all you have to do is just salt the oats.

Just salt the oats. You put salt in notes. And I tell her that I’m telling you that horse will get thirsty and that horse will drink. The salt is the connection piece. So when we talk about advocating versus developing, when we talk about true mentorship, uh, it’s, it’s about, it is, it’s trust. It’s relationship one-on-one. It’s mentorship one-on-one. But every day as a leader, you are making deposits of trust or you are making withdrawals and you must make more deposits than you do withdrawals. It’s the difference between development and advocating. Because if you’re listening to this and you’re a business owner, or you’re running your own sales team and you’re a manager, well you’re, you’re probably thinking, well, I gotta we still got to get results. We still have to, we still have to meet quotas and goals and we’re still trying to make a profit.

We’re still trying to grow. Yes, and I understand that, but everyone of your employees is asking the question, let me know when it gets to the part about me. Are you making more deposits than you are making withdrawals? One of the greatest ways that we found, uh, that Sam, that great leaders, uh, one of the best ways to deposit, uh, an effort of trust was through what we call status interviews. Um, it’s not stay interviews on exit interview. It’s not a one on one management meeting. If you look at the word status and I, I come from a background of the medical field and that’s why we call it this, that in in the medical world, if anybody’s dying or they’re there a heart Tufts situation where they’re battling for their life, the Orr techs or the doctors or the physicians or the emergency personnel, always comment on the status, what’s the status of the patient, what’s their status?

Give me a status update and the status refers to the vital signs. That’s all they’re talking about. So your vital signs are your respiratory rate, your blood rate of speeding, your unit, blood pressure, your heart rate and your respiratory rate, body temperature, blood pressure, sorry, heart rate and respiratory rate. Those are your vital signs. If those are out of whack, if one of those is missing or one of those of them doing well, it’s going to affect your status. And so what you do is you check the Bibles and the vitals determine treatment and then what you do is after you treat the patient, you go back and you check the vitals and then the vitals will determine treatment. And then you check the vitals you want to get them through and even status until you maintain healthy stability longterm. And so we have found that great leaders in some way, shape or form.

And again, this came through the eyes of the employees when an employee would say, I love it here. And you’d ask them why and what do you love and how do you feel hurt? How do you feel seen? How do you feel? Understood. They went back and they commented many times on the power of a status interview and we found that the status interviews in one way, shape or another consisted of three questions that great leaders always ask their people. Uh, because it’s all about checking in, right? It’s all about having a pulse on your people. You have to get to the part about them. How can we get to the part about them? If you don’t know that, if you don’t ask them, we’ve always said that age old adage of like if you feed a man a fish and feed him for a day, but if you can teach Sam man how to fish, then you fed him for a lifetime, right?

I’ve always heard that and said, who said the guy wanted a freaking fish? Right? When you were saying like [inaudible] what if he wants us to hamburger? What half the ask? You have to ask your people and so the status interview gives you the opportunity to ask. Leadership is a journey. Management is a journey. Mentorship is, is constant tweaks and changes and you have to be willing to adapt. You have to be willing to change and you must be willing to change it. The way that the employees advocating for that change in a way that the employee is needing the change. And then you build a win win from your perspective as a leader and their perspective as an employee through the deposits, the more you deposit with trust that allows you to withdraw. It’s a, it’s a back and forth game. So the three questions to the status interview that we found with great leaders would consistently ask in some way, shape or form was question number one is what can we do to keep you here?

Number one, what can we do to keep you here? Even just like when you know the vitals aren’t crazy bad. Like it’s like don’t be afraid to ask that. Yes. Even when it’s like I’m not going anywhere. Yeah. Uh, but just to simply ask that, I like that communicates worth, it communicates value. It’s just like I just want you to know we value you and I’ve got to keep you. Yeah, God keep you. So what can I do to make sure that you stay? So that’s number one. And then number two is what is getting in the way of your success? And I almost treat that a little bit to say what is getting in the way of your ultimate success level? Because everybody’s [inaudible] in the company, have a person. And again, this is not as we’re doing right now after this. Love that immediate advocate.

Awesome. And remember the point of the status interview is not to talk about development, it’s not to talk about performance issues. It’s not to talk about what needs to be done better. This is your chance to check the vitals, just checking vials so that you can treat better and I think that, you know, sometimes managers and leaders, they don’t know how big of a, you know, it might just seem like a paper cut, like turnover rate retention. We look at that as like, ah, easy come, easy go. Or it’s just the way the industry is. If I hear that one more time like, well, it’s just retail or it’s just food and beverage or it’s just summer sales, it’s just how it is. It’s not true. That is not true. There are different organizations and different entities in those industries that are keeping people for years. The retention level is off the charts and I believe if McDonald’s can keep an employee for five years versus five months, that’s a win. And what that does for your organization and cost savings, morale, culture. If it adds up, it always leads to higher profit, dollar signs, increased margins. It’s a vital thing that we just, we have to, we have to think about, we have cause know it’s costing your company a lot of money when somebody leaves.

Oh a hundred percent I mean people spend, I tell people, I’m like, I have an online training program that helps obviously training and getting guys sign faster. And I tell people, I’m like, you spent thousands of dollars a month just trying to hire people, but you don’t spend any time and energy trying to keep them.

Yeah, that’s right. That’s right. Yep. And the last question, the last [inaudible] that they ask is, what can I do to help you get there?

So you’re just hitting on, I’m the connection and the mentor. I’m the guy, I’m the advocate, I’m the advocate and the advocate. I’m here to back you up. I’m here to make sure you’re successful. I’m here to connect you to your J. Love that. Write those three questions down. That’s my invitation. Because too often leaders are even afraid to have those conversations. You know what if the answer isn’t what I wanted to be. Absolutely. You know what I mean? And I think that, you know, by, by just kind of having a playbook like that, like just go in and say, Hey, can we have 20 minutes ask history questions. Powerful did. Yeah.

And she would just really quickly, I need to point, cause a lot of people will listen to this and go, I’m afraid of what they’ll say. Yeah. You know, what did they go? I want two weeks paid vacation, give me some ski passes I want for free food every, every day or what if they, what are they ask for something that I can’t give up? Yeah, that’s a good question. My that just happened. Yeah. My cons, I exit and I was happened to pop down. Um, at least you asked, at least you asked. And I think it’s okay to be honest in saying I can’t do that right now. Like that request, like here’s our limitations. This is what we’re struggling with on our end, but what’s something else that we can do? What you’re, again, you’re building a connection, you’re building communication, you’re building a a sense for you know, improvement and we’re bringing humanity back into the workplace and who doesn’t value that?

Who doesn’t say and, and I think again, as we try to find a win, win, win, win situation for everybody and everything that we’re doing, that’s where people again feel appreciated, respected, heard and seen. And I know there’s times where I ask a boss for a raise and the postures that I couldn’t do at East, I can’t do it right now. Well, what else can we do? We still value you. We still want to keep you here. And it still meant a lot to me. I went back to the workplace going, well forget it. I’m going to go over to the next company that offers me more money. Like, no, Joe’s a good dude. I’m going to keep working for gel and Joe’s going to keep helping me. And it might not be exactly what I want. We’re going to get that. We’re going to get to a place where it just works. And again, it’s the intangibles versus the tangibles. And it’s not always the tangible money, benefits, rewards. And that’s not always the most important part of a successful business. The intangibles, that relationship, that connection, the significance, the mentorship, the coworkers, the feeling, the joy that matters. There’s

so be it played it out. Well I do. And I fire guys, like that’s all I gotta say. I’m sitting here going, I struggle. Like I, I think a lot of times we get in our own world as a manager or leader and sometimes it gets selfish and we forget, like the biggest joy comes from not only us succeeding, but it’s helping other succeed. And I think that a lot of people in this business, they, they forget the feeling of a phone call from one of your reps that, you know, is like, dude, I just bought my first house and it’s right. You know, or, you know, I just, you know, I never dreamed I’d make six figures. Like my dad only made 50 grand his whole life and you know what I mean? Or whatever that is. And I think people forget that fulfillment that comes from having a winning culture, having a winning, you know, employee that that literally looks up to you and says, dude, like you were the catalyst that changed my legs and there’s nothing better.

There’s no better feeling. And I think it’s easy to, like when we talk about burnout or you just hired as a manager, there’s nothing that spark you more and light the fire when when someone comes up and says, you changed my mind. Yeah, I did something better today, or my family and my dreams because of you. Yeah. I don’t know. There’s just, there’s something special to that. We freak, we forget that when we get caught up in the rat race of so many things going on and I’m, I just can’t handle all this. I just need a break. Like, you know, you just get so bogged down or sometimes like, dude, go to the 30,000 foot view and like see the gift and the blessings, you’ve been able to impact others if you’re doing your job right. You know what I mean? And then reflect yourself. Like look in the mirror sometimes and say, why are a lot of people leaving me? And that’s a, that’s a hard assessment. I mean that’s a huge indicator and a lot of times is the leader of the mentor. You got to take this feedback, you gotta take that as well. You may see, you may in your internally think you’re doing everything right, but obviously you need some, some hard feedback to say

do something different girls, these people wouldn’t be leaving all the time. Totally. And it’s usually the little things like we found when the employee would say, I love it here. Like it was never like this granny story or like this huge thing. Like it was always like, I just love it when they, when we just go to lunch and I, I love my, every time when it’s my birthday, like they just, they, they just made me feel like 1 million bucks. I’ll never forget my first day when I was hired that that first day when everybody took me out to lunch and they just praise me and I came back to my desk and there was a plaque with my name on it and I had this know like little it’s moments. It is moments. And that’s what the book talks about is we found that great mentors were just really good at creating moments of single moments in time that were just special. And again, it was a little, but little by little makes it a little a lot and it matters to people.

Well dude, I’m excited for you to blow minds on the main stage. It’s an honor to have you there. And uh, you know, like I said at the beginning, if you haven’t got your ticket, go to DW, conduct comm and uh, reach out the client. Now he’s, he’s definitely a, uh, an icon in the speaking world and has a lot of value to give on company culture, retention, mentorship, leadership. Um, and honestly, there’s been a ton of life, like just nuggets. Just done this podcast. So I’d go read, listen, write down some of those questions. And uh, if you got some value, share this like it, give it, give Taga, Taga manager or mentor that maybe you shouldn’t see this cause he’s sucking or, or, you know what I mean? Like, like whatever it is. But, you know, share the love. I think this was a lot of great free value just created. So I appreciate your time. Get on the shows. And honestly, this was, this was awesome. Love you guys.

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